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Working at Sage Software — Reviews by Employees

Learn what employees have to say about Sage Software pay, work/life balance, care potential, job security, and much more by reading our anonymous employee reviews.

Reviews of Jobs at Sage Software

3.4Rating Details
Category
Pay5
Respect4
Benefits5
Job Security3
Work/Life Balance4
Career Growth3
Location5
Co-Workers2
Work Environment2

From Florida — 11/27/2009

There are three key problems with Sage North America. The first, as others have indicated, is the stagnation that has been allowed to happen across many of the product lines. If there is no innovation in features, functionality or interface, there can not be a lot of sales in the future. The next key problem is that the company has lacked effective leadership. They have not "read" the customer base correctly and therefore have not built products that meet the needs of the customer base. The third problem is that the English business model does not seem to work for an American marketplace.

As far as being a good company to work for, I've been with the company for almost 8 years and find that the pay and benefits are very good, the workplace is relatively free of favortism, and our location has a high degree of cohesiveness and team spirit. I think this is a pretty good place to work.
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3.1Rating Details
Category
Pay3
Respect3
Benefits4
Job Security2
Work/Life Balance4
Career Growth3
Location4
Co-Workers3
Work Environment3

From Irvine — 10/30/2009

Is it true that Sage has taken a decision globally that there shall be no merit increase in pay, company wide this December. Any one else heard of this?
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3.1Rating Details
Category
Pay3
Respect4
Benefits3
Job Security2
Work/Life Balance3
Career Growth2
Location4
Co-Workers4
Work Environment4

From US — 10/16/2009

Working in a place where everything is on the downslide is difficult. When things are hot, working, and moving forward itís exciting. You donít need a lot of pay to work for a place where valuable things are happening, but when you work for a place going downhill itís sad.
Sage is stagnant and dying. Itís not the place you want to work. Not that theyíre hiring anyway.
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4.5Rating Details
Category
Pay4
Respect5
Benefits5
Job Security4
Work/Life Balance5
Career Growth5
Location5
Co-Workers5
Work Environment5

From Atlanta GA — 09/12/2009

My experience with Sage has been quite the opposite of what some of the respondents have expressed.
I have always felt like a valuable member of any team at Sage in my almost 10 years of service. Yes I was laid off last year. Was it a difficult time? Absolutely yes. Do I feel bitter? Absolutely not
I understood why then and I understand why now a company has to make difficult decisions like layoffs or personnel restructuring. Change sometimes is the hardest thing to adjust to. When one is working for a publicly held company the confidence of the investors is so vital to sustaining the existence of a worldwide company like Sage. When businesses in the market place were shrunk or became non-existent the challenge to generate revenue proportionately decreases for a software company like Sage. Cutting Costs or increasing revenues are the only two options to keep an acceptable margin in order to be a viable company in the market place and maintain investor confidence.
In today's market a company has to be fluid and flexible to take difficult steps to continue in the market place.
I never lost hope that Sage would hire me back when an opportunity came up. Almost after 9 and half months, guess what? I am back at Sage at a different location in a different role and finding ways to contribute everyday so we can grow and become healthy and strong once again. If I were to become one of those that had to be laid off once again, it would not change how I feel about Sage. I am saddened by folks who have had to leave Sage and feel bitterness. I am grateful to management and leadership that they have made corrections to help us face in a direction to grow in small decisive increments in this economy. Management has had a tough road in making decisions to let good people go. If one has truly loved where they worked then one must also have confidence that layoffs are not a mindless action. It is a bitter pill to administer so the company can grow and hire once again. I for one do not envy the one's who have to make and execute those decisions.
With time we would look back at this time in our economy and say the forces of the market did not crush the Sage vision to be the leading software provider for small to medium companies around the globe.
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3.1Rating Details
Category
Pay3
Respect4
Benefits4
Job Security2
Work/Life Balance4
Career Growth2
Location5
Co-Workers4
Work Environment2

From Atlanta — 08/27/2009

Sage is putting its own nails in the coffin. The first nail started with poor middle and upper management that let the company grow stagnant. Sage Software is still run like itís 1992 and that simply canít work in this new aggressive Internet climate. The software is painfully outdated and the only innovation is new acquisitions: Acquisitions that create new problems, as the backend of each of those companies doesnít match everything else. Leading to another joke at Sage: Atlas.
The second nail is the economy that is exposing the weakness of Sage and has shown that Sage is the software company equivalent of Dunder Mifflin. With poor software, innovation in name only, and an IS structure that is inept Sage is dying. The weak economy has caused businesses to cut back on software purchases and to think through purchases more and no one wants to spend on software that is so outdated.
The third nail is the layoffs that are removing some good employees and a few bad ones Ė most good. Everyone fears for their job and morale is in the toilet. When the economy recovers the capable and smart employees will leave, and are already working on their exit strategy. The poor employees will stay thus pushing Sage deeper into the hole.
This is a dying company that canít even be saved if Microsoft bought it. I donít believe Sage will exist in the U.S. in ten years, maybe not even five.
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4.2Rating Details
Category
Pay4
Respect5
Benefits5
Job Security4
Work/Life Balance4
Career Growth3
Location5
Co-Workers5
Work Environment4

From Remote office - east coast — 05/05/2009

I am very happy with my position and the expections. I enjoy working with the endusers and all of my co-workers and managers. We all want each other to be the best when we service our customers.
There is a communication disconnect regarding policies and documentation. We receive many emails that say basically nothing about initiatives that I can take into my position. I would like more freedom to help the clients with what they want rather than the restrictions that are placed on time constraints. Not every client is at the optimum level. They deserve the same success with the product.If we find out what they want and deliver that, they will be happy. Sure they may have purchased a Lexus, but the Neon is all they can handle right now. I'd rather that the client take the lead they are comforable with. We need to improve our referral base, and GREATLY simplify the product.
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3.6Rating Details
Category
Pay3
Respect4
Benefits4
Job Security2
Work/Life Balance5
Career Growth2
Location5
Co-Workers5
Work Environment5

From Pleasanton, CA — 10/10/2008

It's tough to do some of these ratings because before we were Sage, we were ACCPAC, and back then things were much different - some good some bad, but overall much better. When we became Sage, and the GM left a year later, Accpac was literally gone - both the team and what used to be the corporate office. Little by little we dwindled down, and as we did, and the upper-management from Sage Corporate took over everything (the infamous "re-organization") respect for everyone there was gone, we essentially no longer existed. The respect I always had from my co-workers, in that office and in Richmond, BC, was enormous. But the heirarchy had none. I was caught in one of the many layoffs, and that was perfectly fine. The majority of my time there was with Accpac, and I LOVED that! The two years with Sage was a lesson on what NOT to go for in my next endeavor.
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4.3Rating Details
Category
Pay4
Respect5
Benefits3
Job Security5
Work/Life Balance4
Career Growth4
Location5
Co-Workers5
Work Environment5

From st. petersburg — 05/11/2008

All and all this is a great place to work. I have worked for some terrible companies in my short time so when I work for a place like Sage, I really come to appreciate it. The department I work in has job responsibilities that are crazy hard but on the plus side that's the only hard part of the work. Company politics are present but not significant enough to disrupt my day to day duties. For what I'm doing the pay is weak but for the region the pay is very good. Respect is really a core value that management seems to take to heart, even the managers that aren't really that good. Iím on the fence about are benefits because our time off practices are excellent but our insurance carrier is horrible. I've only heard of one lay off and it was just one person and it was well before my time. Involuntary terminations do happen but they are very rare and the ones I know about have real justification. Work life balance is good. I am starting to sense a trend where they want more and more of our time however it hasn't gotten invasive. Promotion potential is there , you can move to other departments or you can go up levels in your current, the only thing you cant do if you are already an employee is be made a sr manager. They seem to like to hire managers from outside but even that seems to have some justification. Location is pretty decent as our building is in a transportation nexus as all major roads in the area meet a mile to the north. Co-worker competence is a mixed bag. They used to hire people that had some proven potential but it seems more and more duds are seeping in. The good news is there is still a very large core of seriously talented people. Work environment is good. There will always be the struggle to secure more and more luxuries however if we as employees never gained another foot of ground, I would be happy with what we have now.
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3.7Rating Details
Category
Pay3
Respect2
Benefits5
Job Security5
Work/Life Balance3
Career Growth5
Location5
Co-Workers5
Work Environment3

From Richmond, BC — 03/26/2008

Benefits are great - full health/dental, RRSP matched by company, etc.
Work/life balance - not encouraged, as the GM who is much looked up to, is lauded for coming in at 6am and not leaving till 7pm at night, and she has two young kids. Career potential is good because they promote from within a lot. Pay isn't so competitive for the industry though.
People are competent and job security is excellent - many people have been there a loooong time. The company is very hierarchical and likes to change and acquire but employees can be resistant to change which can be an obstacle. On the whole, it's a good place to work but because it is so separated by department and so hierarchical, your actual experience there really depends on who your manager is and how your department is as that will be the majority of your work experience, so it can go up or down, as I have witnessed some really AWFUL management and some really GREAT management in departments there.
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