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Working at Meijer — Reviews by Employees

Learn what employees have to say about Meijer pay, work/life balance, care potential, job security, and much more by reading our anonymous employee reviews.

Reviews of Jobs at Meijer

1.1Rating Details
Category
Pay1
Respect1
Benefits2
Job Security1
Work/Life Balance1
Career Growth1
Location2
Co-Workers1
Work Environment1

From Algonquin, IL — 10/15/2010

Someone close to me worked at Meijer in Algonquin, IL for several years. They were hired to be a Director, then later for no apparent reason was sent to another store a year later. They worked for a boss that threaten their job on a daily basis and had no respect for others. My friend was promised the world until hired then received nothing but back stabbing, men gossiping and disrespect. My friend ended up quitting before he actually broke the neck of the store director who talk to him like he was a piece of crap! Good thing. This company does SUCK *SS.
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4.2Rating Details
Category
Pay3
Respect5
Benefits4
Job Security5
Work/Life Balance5
Career Growth3
Location5
Co-Workers4
Work Environment5

From Jackson, MI — 08/18/2010

(Iím expecting this review to be long and comprehensive. Iím sorry, but I donít think Iíll be able to keep myself from being long-winded. I have an interesting, seemingly rare experience of working at Meijer that few (if any) of the other Meijer employees here seem to share. Therefore, I feel itís important that I be thorough with my review. Itís incredibly important to show all perspectives, even if one happens to be in the minority. Bear with me though, itís going to be a LONG one.)
Wow, I'm actually kind of surprised by the extremely low overall score other employees have given to Meijer. Apparently, my experience has been the exception, but it's still valid nonetheless. Once I explain my situation though it should provide some clarity as to why I consider my history with Meijer to be mostly positive.
I began working for Meijer in the Garden department when I was 16 (I'm now 22 years old). I had never had a job before, so I didn't really have any expectations. I received plenty of hours for a high school kid working in the summer (close to 40 even some week), and this continued until I was transferred to the Fashion area at the end of that summer due to the end of the season, and therefore, a major cut in the Garden Centerís hours.
Anyway, I worked in Fashions continuously until I turned 18 and began college Ė I moved away for school, and went on educational leave. For the next two years, it was a back-and-forth between being away at college, then returning to during spring, summer, and winter breaks. Each time I resumed working at Meijer, I returned with absolutely no hassle - all I had to do was make one phone call and was always promptly put on the schedule.
The only disappointment I experienced regarding educational leave was that, according to the employee handbook, itís the only type of leave (of both voluntary and involuntary) in which I lost all seniority in terms of hours and scheduling. However, I donít really consider this to be a negative in terms of my viewpoint of Meijer as an employer. Mostly I was just very grateful to be pretty much guaranteed my job back each time, so I never had to do any dreadful summer job searching after completing another laborious year at college. It was great to have that kind of security, and made me feel good to know that I was welcomed back so eagerly. My managers always made me feel valued and appreciated as an employee. I never felt like my hard-work went unappreciated.
After four years of working for Meijer, I moved into an apartment in my college town for the summer after my sophomore year at college to take summer classes. Therefore, my educational leave expired Ė I didnít expect to return to Meijer again, just because I planned to remain on campus until I graduated.
However, plans changed and I ended up moving back home and decided to become a commuter student for the remainder of time it was going to take to complete my college degree (this is basically present time). The job market in my town is terrible right now, and I applied to dozens of jobs before I ran into one of my old managers at the other Meijer location in my town (which happens to be considerably closer to my home). We began talking, one thing led to another, and next thing I knew I had completed a 3-interview process and was offered a part-time job at this store in (surprise, surprise!) my former primary department, Fashions. Needless to say, I eagerly accepted and am currently waiting to hear back as to when my first day of work is going to be.
Part of the reason why my application was pushed to the top of the prospective employee pile is because the manager I ran into that day strongly recommended me to the store director. My previous four years of employment at Meijer were crucial for me in landing a job at this other, proximally-advantageous store.
While I respect all of the other reviewerís opinions and experiences, I canít help but to be skeptical of some of them. Because Meijer is unionized, managers canít do things such as (for example) award performance-based pay increases and/or schedule certain employees with more hours even if theyíre harder-working, more competent and reliable than their coworkers. If this was allowed, I can only imagine the likely increase in scathing reviews to this website! This is actually one of my main criticisms of being an employee at Meijer, and itís not anything they can even control. It still makes me bristle to think that my lazy yet higher-seniority coworkers in the past have made SO MUCH MORE than me per hour.
One of the only explanations I could come up with for the fact that most of the reviews on here are largely negative is that there potentially exists for a considerable gap from store-to-store in terms of internal politics and employee-manager dynamics. I donít really buy this explanation, though. Iíve worked with enough bullshitters (both here and at the other part-time jobs Iíve had in the past) to discern between legitimate complaints and those provided by individuals who have an inability to take responsibility for their own actions.
For example, if you missed five days of work due to a legitimate illness and your manager refused your doctorís notes upon your return (eh, I kind of doubt this really happened, but I suppose itís possible), are you REALLY going to let it go? Yeah, I didnít think so. I have heard some pretty outrageous excuses from former coworkers as to why they missed work/didnít complete a task/left early/etc., and unless you have established a good track record of being a dependable, honest employee, your manager is NOT going to hassle you. They donít have the time or energy to do so. But if itís just yet another questionable-sounding excuse from a long history of many, then yeah, theyíre going to take it with a grain of salt.
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3.2Rating Details
Category
Pay2
Respect3
Benefits5
Job Security4
Work/Life Balance3
Career Growth3
Location3
Co-Workers3
Work Environment3

From southeastern michigan — 04/11/2010

I've worked on midnights for Meijer for a little over a year and its not that bad. The pay isn't great, but the insurance I was able to get for my family after becoming full time is pretty good. I have two immediate bosses. One is very nice and does what he can to keep everyone happy. The other is not as nice. I generally like most the people I work with. The job can be tedious and repetitive, but its really not so bad. I've had to work holidays before but my boss switches who gets what off to be as fair as possible. I pretty much get off every day I've needed for family stuff, like my kids birthdays. I am ok with the job. Overall I'm ok with my job.
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4.1Rating Details
Category
Pay5
Respect4
Benefits4
Job Security4
Work/Life Balance5
Career Growth3
Location5
Co-Workers4
Work Environment5

From Ohio — 08/25/2008

For team members, pay is hourly and it's decent for people with little or no skills or for those who have retired. Full-time rarely is offered, but I know a few people who have managed it by coming in at 5 in the morning for systems or pricing. Utility workers make the least amount of money, but then they are usually teenagers and some of them supposedly never got their raises till they turned 18. Everyone is supposed to get raises every 700 hours (except utility workers it would seem listening to them) and it varies depending on whether the person is in service or the departments. I started at more than minimum wage and so I am making more than I did back when I was at a union Kroger.

Cashiers hate the floor team members (tm) because they can never find items for price checks quick enough and the floor tm hate cashiers because they never give the floor tm enough information about the item or tell the floor tm that the item isn't what the item is. Seriously. Respect is decent, but it will vary from store to store. Sometimes the managers have little feuds that sometimes involves tm being told to do ridiculous stuff, but that's maybe three times in over a year. Customers will rarely respect you and it's always your fault.

I know part-time people can get benefits, but I am not really sure that much about it.

You can have a life if you want it, but don't expect to have holidays off. I work almost full-time whereas people above me work half the amount that I work. However, there are some people who are full-time that work only in the morning meaning almost everyone else has to work nights. You do get paid more for holidays. All of my requests for a day off have been granted without question and I stopped adding excuses for them.

Sometimes you can get promoted, but I have yet to see a tm become a manager. I have seen it the other way around. The best step will probably become an LP. If you are willing to work at like 5 AM, then you can sometimes get full-time depending on the department.

Location is fairly standard and dependent on location. My location is pretty good.

Co-workers can be psycho and some can be stupid. It's always a hit or miss depending on your store. Most of my coworkers are decent.

Work environment is decent. Back of the store is always hot and it's hard to hear the pages with the constant beeps of the registers, but overall it's decent. The store is air-conditioned, but you can still feel a little bit too warm if you're throwing stock. In winter, it usually is a little bit cold.

A negative is that I have heard horror stories about union stores such as you can't use the bathroom while you're on the clock if you're a cashier. I don't see how they can enforce it, but supposedly they made people sign papers.
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